Buddy Bash | AspenTimes.com

Buddy Bash

Mary Eshbaugh Hayes

Showing the model for the mansion that Lenny Boogie Weinglass will build on his property are Carol Dopkin, who will handle the sale, and Boogie, who hosted Boogies Bash for the Buddies. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of the mansion will go to the Buddy Program. (MEH)

Every summer one of the biggest parties is Boogie’s Bash for the Buddies, a benefit for the Aspen Buddy Program given by Lenny “Boogie” Weinglass at his fabulous Merry Go Round Ranch on White Horse Springs. Lenny is chairman of the board for the Buddy Program, while Kathryn Penn is president of the board and Cari Kuhlman is vice president. The Buddy Program provides mentoring for youth in the Roaring Fork Valley with “Big Buddies” and “Little Buddies.” The Big Buddies are adults from the community who volunteer their time with children. The Little Buddies are youths between the ages of 6 and 18 who need companionship and guidance. The Big Buddies visit their Little Buddies two or three times a month, taking them skiing or swimming or to the movies, or whatever they decide to do.Even though it rained on the afternoon of the giant party, tents and walkways protected the partygoers, and it seemed that there must have been 1,000 people milling around. There was a silent auction in one tent and then a dinner and dance in another tent. Local restaurants had booths in both tents, offering their famous fare. The dancing was rock ‘n’ roll.

Boogie displayed an architectural rendering of a mansion he plans to build on nearby property. A portion of the proceeds from the sale will go to the Buddy Program; bidding started at $12.75 million.There were so many new faces at the Bash for the Buddies that I will be running some more next week.The August 2006 issue of Architectural Digest magazine includes an article by Aspen writer Dena Kaye that tells about her Danny Kaye and Sylvia Fine Kaye Foundation, which helps fund Panchachuli Women Weavers, a collective in India with more than 700 members who create bright textiles on wood looms.The same issue of the magazine has an article about a house, Casa Buena Vida, in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, that Aspen photographer David Marlow got to visit and photograph.

The August 2006 issue of Vanity Fair magazine has an article about surfing in California in 1950s America that makes several references to Aspenite Brian Wilson, who was a kid then and learned to surf at Malibu and in Hawaii. To quote the article, “Among the half-dozen or so females on surfboards in Malibu was a dignified Beverly Hills divorced mother of three sons, Eugenia Wilson. ‘Mrs. Wilson had Connecticut Yankee airs and a Modigliani face,'” stated Mike Nader (one of the surfers interviewed for the story). Eugenia was the “mother of his friend Brian Wilson (not the Beach Boy, but one of the three heirs to Wilson’s House of Suede and Leather, a large store across from the Beverly Hilton). Eugenia was the only mom in the ocean and she was good.'” Brian, his wife, Kathy, and their two daughters have had an Aspen home for more than 10 years, and Brian was president of the board for the Aspen Historical Society.Spending the past month in the Brumder House on East Bleeker Street were Joe Draker and Karen Sexton and several family members. Joe lived in Aspen during the 1980s, working here in restaurants. He now has three Tex-Mex restaurants called Maudie’s in Austin, Texas.Undercurrent … With the traffic in downtown Aspen being so heavy and congested, it has forced the people riding bicycles to move onto the sidewalks. Now, if you are walking, you have to really watch so as not to be run over by a bicycle!