Beware global cooling | AspenTimes.com

Beware global cooling

Dear Editor:(This letter was originally addressed to Dan Richardson, the city of Aspen’s global warming project manager.)Just to get basic facts consistent, I’ve wrestled with the fact that until very recently, earth temperatures have correlated with solar activity and not with CO2. Even for most of the 20th century (up to 1970).Yet taking the U.N.-based International Panel on Climate Control (IPCC) data (all of it) there are warming gases, such as CO2 and there are cooling gases such as sulphated aerosols, which, according to SAR data, could possibly cancel most of the CO2 warming.However, what we have done in the United States is to remove the sulfur from diesel and gasoline, and put scrubbers to capture it on coal-fired power plants. Fortunately, the rest of the world hasn’t yet followed us, as these approaches are expensive and are still producing sulfated aerosols. We in the United States are then left with unopposed CO2, which is warming.In the lower atmosphere, sulfated aerosols cause “acid rain.” A problem in the East, but very desirable in the West because of our alkaline soils. The PH on our ranch is 8.24. We actually buy concentrated sulfuric acid in 55-gallon drums to neutralize or slightly acidify our irrigation water. Even the rain in the West is alkaline. We have alkaline rain instead of acid rain. We measured rain water at a PH of 7.4 recently.There are many geopolitical advantages to renewable energy and energy independence, but those considerations should not override clear thinking about the causes of global warming. If it is not understood, then opportunities to manipulate it are lost.As the subject suggests, beware of global cooling. Several have suggested by 2030 we will be in a full-blown mini-ice age, which seems to always follow peaks in solar activity, such as the 8,000-year peak we have just experienced. If that happens we may be very grateful for CO2 warming. I think your study should definitely include that.Mike MasonCedaredge