Aspen’s Holiday House rises from ashes | AspenTimes.com

Aspen’s Holiday House rises from ashes

John Colson
The Aspen Times
Aspen CO, Colorado
Jordan Curet The Aspen Times
ALL | The Aspen Times

ASPEN ” The venerable Holiday House lodge, destroyed by fire during a remodeling project a little more than a year ago, is about to be back in business as employee housing for the Aspen Skiing Co.

And this time around, it will feature the latest in “green” building techniques.

In fact, if its builders’ hopes come true, the new complex of modular units will earn the highest marks possible for sustainable building methods ” a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council’s multifamily program.

Bill Boyd Jr., whose father is general manger of ModSystemSB, builder of the project, said that the Holiday House would be the only building in the United States that contains more than four residential units to be LEED-Platinum certified.

Located on West Hopkins Avenue, the Holiday House actually is two distinct buildings ” the modular structure just completed, and the traditionally constructed Holiday House annex next door, which was not damaged by the fire in November 2007.

The burned shell of the old main building was demolished in May 2008, and crews have been working feverishly to get the new structure up and habitable by the coming ski season.

A mammoth construction crane dropped half of the modular units into place Nov. 20, and was scheduled to swing the last of the 25 units into place Monday. But the driver reportedly got delayed at another job site and was unable to make it.

So, according to Bill Boyd Sr., the final blocks were to be swung into place Tuesday, assuming the crane made it to Aspen.

The foundation features “insulated concrete forms” known for insulative qualities, according to Mark Vogele, construction manager for the Aspen Skiing Co. Lumber for the rooms was furnished by Greenspot, Inc., a Carbondale company that supplies builders with lumber milled from what Greenspot CEO Chris Jacobson said is the fastest-growing kind of tree available.

The windows, said Boyd, are “super-insulated,” and each unit has a heat-recovery ventilator, an air-transfer system that replaces stale, interior air with fresh outdoor air, but without losing the heat built up on the inside.

“To date, no dumpsters have been taken to the landfill with total jobsite waste being less than five standard 40-gallon trash cans,” Vogele wrote in an e-mail Monday. “A detailed waste management plan is in place to recycle any construction waste produced on site.”

More than 50 percent of all materials going into the site “are procured within 500 miles of the site, reducing diesel and gasoline consumption through freight transfer,” he said.

That is just part of a long list of green-building techniques and materials that, according to Vogele, have gone into the project, all intended to lead toward the platinum LEED certification. Vogele said the overall project cost came to about $4 million, or $340 per square foot.

Vogele said the new Holiday House will contain nine 1-bedroom units, at least initially reserved for long-term employees; a single 2-bedroom unit, for the resident manager; and 13 studios for seasonal workers.

Jeff Hanle, spokesman for the Skico, said the building is scheduled to be open for residents to move in by Jan. 17.

jcolson@aspentimes.com


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.