Aspen’s been there, done that | AspenTimes.com

Aspen’s been there, done that

Janet Urquhart

If Aspen thinks it’s ahead of the pack when it comes to ski resorts, it’s perhaps with good reason.Likewise, mountain towns that shun comparisons to Aspen may be fooling themselves at best.The headlines of late from a few of our resort brethren sound hauntingly familiar: A ban on first-floor offices in the central business district, debate over how to weight a housing lottery in favor of those who’ve been waiting the longest, a big police bust that gets people talking, and the release of a draft environmental impact statement to widen a highway.It’s all in the news – other people’s news.The cops in Jackson, Wyo., enlisted the help of an 18-year-old “citizen volunteer” to check on compliance with state liquor laws. Clerks at nine businesses – a combination of restaurants, bars and liquor stores – received citations for serving a minor, according to a report in the Jackson Hole News & Guide.Meanwhile, Telluride is contemplating a ban on new offices on the first floor of buildings on its main commercial strip in response to an influx of real estate offices in prime retail spaces. Aspen took that step more than a year ago.Telluride, by the way, also just tweaked its housing lottery.In Ketchum/Sun Valley, the widening of the highway serving the Idaho resort is one step closer with the recent unveiling of a 1,100-page draft environmental impact statement. One alternative outlined in the highway plan includes a high-occupancy vehicle lane during heavy traffic hours, according to the Idaho Mountain Express. (A public comment period is under way, in case any Roaring Fork Valley locals would like to weigh in.)Down in Durango, an ordinance with “infill” in the title has won approval, but the legislation appears to focus on clamping down on house sizes. Been there, done that.Janet Urquhart’s e-mail address is janet@aspentimes.com