Aspen snow removal: ‘It’s gonna take days’ | AspenTimes.com
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Aspen snow removal: ‘It’s gonna take days’

A boy stands in front of a pile of snow at the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority bus barn across Highway 82 from the Aspen-Pitkin County Airport on Tuesday.
Jeanne McGovern/The Aspen Times |

While skiers and snowboarders might be rejoicing over the largest snowstorm in recent years, “hallelujah” is not the first word on the lips of those who have to remove all that snow.

“I think everyone in the snow-removal business is working their butt off,” said Dan Nelson, the downtown coordinator for the city’s Parks and Recreation Department.

Nelson said he and his crew of eight agree that the storm, which dropped more than 3 feet on area ski mountains, is the biggest since the winter of 2007-08. This storm left between 24 and 30 inches of snow in town, he said.

“This is definitely one to remember,” Nelson said. “This one came down so fast.”

Jerry Nye, Aspen’s streets superintendent and a Colorado native, agreed.

“It was right there with (other big storms),” he said. “But this one never quit and gave us a break.”

Nye said Tuesday he’s not sure how much snow fell and has been too busy to read a newspaper to find out.

“I don’t even know if more is coming,” he said.

Nye said Tuesday that his crews were still working on clearing the downtown core area from Cemetery Lane to Original Curve. He estimated that job would likely take until Monday, when crews can turn their attention to residential areas.

For the core, crews were mainly working at night and plowing the snow into the middle of the street, then having a huge snowblower load it into 18 rented dumptrucks. Loading one of the trucks takes about two minutes, he said. Crews took out more than 200 loads of snow Monday night, Nye said.

Those trucks take the snow and dump it near the city shop across from the airport, Nye said. However, this year city crews also will dump snow at the Marolt Open Space, which is only used in big snow winters, he said.

“We’re going to have a lot of snow to haul out,” Nye said.

The snow piles across from the airport are already about two stories high, Nelson said. It will be left there to melt on its own.

Parks and Recreation crews were still working Tuesday to clean up the core area alleys, sidewalks and pedestrian malls, Nelson said. They were dumping the snow across from the Wheeler Opera House and near the fire pit on Galena Street, though they were running out space Tuesday afternoon, he said.

Beginning Wednesday, his crews will begin using a front-end loader and a dumptruck to remove those snow piles, Nelson said.

“It’s going to take days,” he said.

jauslander@aspentimes.com


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Aspen snow removal: ‘It’s gonna take days’

A boy stands in front of a pile of snow at the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority bus barn across Highway 82 from the Aspen-Pitkin County Airport on Tuesday.
Jeanne McGovern/The Aspen Times |

While skiers and snowboarders might be rejoicing over the largest snowstorm in recent years, “hallelujah” is not the first word on the lips of those who have to remove all that snow.

“I think everyone in the snow-removal business is working their butt off,” said Dan Nelson, the downtown coordinator for the city’s Parks and Recreation Department.

Nelson said he and his crew of eight agree that the storm, which dropped more than 3 feet on area ski mountains, is the biggest since the winter of 2007-08. This storm left between 24 and 30 inches of snow in town, he said.

“This is definitely one to remember,” Nelson said. “This one came down so fast.”

Jerry Nye, Aspen’s streets superintendent and a Colorado native, agreed.

“It was right there with (other big storms),” he said. “But this one never quit and gave us a break.”

Nye said Tuesday he’s not sure how much snow fell and has been too busy to read a newspaper to find out.

“I don’t even know if more is coming,” he said.

Nye said Tuesday that his crews were still working on clearing the downtown core area from Cemetery Lane to Original Curve. He estimated that job would likely take until Monday, when crews can turn their attention to residential areas.

For the core, crews were mainly working at night and plowing the snow into the middle of the street, then having a huge snowblower load it into 18 rented dumptrucks. Loading one of the trucks takes about two minutes, he said. Crews took out more than 200 loads of snow Monday night, Nye said.

Those trucks take the snow and dump it near the city shop across from the airport, Nye said. However, this year city crews also will dump snow at the Marolt Open Space, which is only used in big snow winters, he said.

“We’re going to have a lot of snow to haul out,” Nye said.

The snow piles across from the airport are already about two stories high, Nelson said. It will be left there to melt on its own.

Parks and Recreation crews were still working Tuesday to clean up the core area alleys, sidewalks and pedestrian malls, Nelson said. They were dumping the snow across from the Wheeler Opera House and near the fire pit on Galena Street, though they were running out space Tuesday afternoon, he said.

Beginning Wednesday, his crews will begin using a front-end loader and a dumptruck to remove those snow piles, Nelson said.

“It’s going to take days,” he said.

jauslander@aspentimes.com


Support Local Journalism

Support Local Journalism

Readers around Aspen and Snowmass Village make the Aspen Times’ work possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to deliver quality, locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is critical to help us keep our community informed about the evolving coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, however large or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for the development and creation of increased news coverage.

For tax deductible donations, click here.
 

Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User


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