A look at year-old frittatas and a free Mars bar | AspenTimes.com

A look at year-old frittatas and a free Mars bar

Brent Gardner-SmithAspen Times Staff Writer

British skiers have been learning a fair bit about Aspen this month, thanks to two recent travel articles about our fair cty. A recent search of a media database turned up a March 9 article by Roger Bray in The Guardian Newspaper of London, which pegged Aspen as “Hunter S. Thompson’s home town,” which is almost true, given that the good doctor lives eons away in Woody Creek.Bray’s stay in Aspen got off to a good start as he signed up for the “First Tracks” program on Ajax and was greeted by a rare nine-inch powder day.However, reading on, it is clear he was here last winter and not this winter.”We skied on for as long as stamina and hunger pangs would allow, then celebrated with brunch at Gwyn’s, which is surely one of the world’s finest mountain restaurants,” Bray writes. “Wild mushroom frittatas with parmesan and allouette cheese, fresh basil and roasted red peppers, foccacia and coffee, served at a white linen-covered table with a view of Aspen’s million-dollar rooftops.”Alas, Gwyn’s is shuttered this season and a few British skiers may now come and go away hungry. Or at least disappointed.@ATD Sub heds: In from Mars@ATD body copy:Another British newspaper, also on March 9, let its readers peek up Aspen’s skirt, so to speak.Peter Hardy of the Daily Telegraph of London wrote a piece called “Slumming it with the Beautiful People.””In the finest tradition of mink coats and Mars bars, the lady wearing one and eating the other swept out of Aspen’s airport shop with a beatific smile on her flawless face and not so much as a glance at the till,” Hardy wrote at the top of his piece.”‘Would you believe it?’ said the checkout girl, staring in amazement at the exotic confection of animal pelts sashaying toward the departure lounge, trailing a heady vapour of Ralph Lauren Romance. “‘She comes in here like Marilyn Monroe with $10,000 on her shoulders, helps herself to a candy bar, and it doesn’t even occur to her to pay for it. I tell you, I don’t know what kinda folks are coming to Aspen these days.'”Well, as Hardy duly notes, “it is the same folk as ever.”@ATD Sub heds: Food and Wine envy@ATD body copy:Sometimes it takes a little perspective to help you appreciate what you have. Take, for example, the annual food and wine event here.According to Fred Tasker, writing in the March 10 issue of the Miami Herald, Aspen’s got a pretty good thing going.”Champagne and barbecue? Well, you’ve got to think outside the box when you’re trying to turn Miami Beach into ‘the Aspen of the South,’ which is to say one of the nation’s biggest, most glittery wine-and-food fests,” Tasker writes.The South Beach Food and Wine Festival is going after the same American Express cardholders that flock to Aspen each June.”‘We hope to be on a par with the Aspen festival,’ says Lee Schrager, festival director and head of special events for Southern Wine & Spirits. “While the South Beach festival is reaching high with its 200 producers, two-dozen seminars, lunches and dinners and hopes of luring 3,500 fans to its Sunday auction and grand tasting, it has a way to go to catch Aspen. The Food & Wine Magazine Classic in Aspen, Colo., attracts 300 producers, 80 seminars and 5,000 fans.”Not to mention a horde of bottom-feeding locals.

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