Gear: REI’s Quarter Dome Air gets you off the ground | AspenTimes.com
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Gear: REI’s Quarter Dome Air gets you off the ground

by Stephen Regenold

Have you considered camping in the air? A growing trend, “hanging tents,” meld hammock features with bug mesh, zippers, and a fly.

With a rectangular base and more support than a regular hammock, REI’s first hanging shelter hits the market this summer. The Quarter Dome Air is dubbed a minimalist alternative to a tent.

At $219, you get a three-season, one-person home built to hold up to 250 pounds. The base is 81 inches long (and 23 inches wide), so it’s big enough for people over 6 feet tall.

A removable rain fly is included, and the bug net can be zipped off to stow along the base. Fly, stakes, and tent body pack down into a stuff sack that weighs 3 pounds, 2 ounces.

For more on this product, visit https://gearjunkie.com/. Stephen Regenold is the founder and writes about outdoors gear for Gear Junkie.


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