Aspen Times Weekly: SPOT Rescue Update | AspenTimes.com
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Aspen Times Weekly: SPOT Rescue Update

by Stephen Regenold

SPOT devices came to market in 2007. Today, the satellite-connected units are an integral part of the outdoors landscape, used by hundreds of thousands of enthusiasts and initiating nearly two rescues a day, according to the company.

A milestone was reached this fall when SPOT recorded the 4,000th rescue initiated by one of its devices. It happened when Michael Herrera crashed a motorcycle off-roading in remote DeKalb County, Alabama.

A retired firefighter, Herrera leaned on experience as a first responder to assess the scenario. He was stranded, injured and alone. There was no cell signal for a phone.

Herrera had broken his collarbone and three ribs in a crash, and a lung had partially collapsed. Disoriented and in pain, Herrera reached for his SPOT and pressed the S.O.S. button.

Within 40 minutes, an ATV and ambulance were onsite to help. He was transported to a hospital, and he is now recovering at home.

For more on this product, visit https://gearjunkie.com/. Stephen Regenold is the founder and writes about outdoors gear for Gear Junkie.


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