Draymond Green’s coming attractions at Uninterrupted | AspenTimes.com

Draymond Green’s coming attractions at Uninterrupted

Andrew Travers ➫ The Aspen Times
Draymond Green at the Fortune Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen on Tuesday.
Stuart Isett/Fortune Brainstorm Tech |

Draymond Green is taking his next shot in the entertainment business.

The Golden State Warriors’ all-star power forward is a founding partner of Uninterrupted, a multimedia platform he launched last year with Cleveland Cavaliers’ superstar LeBron James and others. This week at the Fortune Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, he talked about the venture and other entertainment initiatives with Warner Bros. CEO Kevin Tsujihara and Uninterrupted CEO Maverick Carter, who also runs the production company SpringHill Entertainment.

The trio said that moving forward, Uninterrupted will connect athletes with filmmakers to create documentaries, short-form scripted shows and first-person testimonials.

“It allows us to show those that don’t think we’re human, that think we’re superhuman, that we are human,” Green said. “It allows you to show who you are.”

Warner Bros. was among the early investors in the company, which thus far has mostly produced first-person online videos by professional athletes.

Tsujihara said his studio’s investment in Uninterrupted and in Carter’s production company are the beginnings of a partnership that will bring more professional athletes into such traditional entertainment vehicles as movies and television.

“For us, it was a huge opportunity because there’s a huge intersection between what we do on the film, television and game side with sports and in particular basketball and music,” he said. “A lot of those circles are beginning to merge together.”

Tsujihara also said feature films with NBA stars are “100 percent” in the works, including the long-planned “Space Jam” reboot with James starring.

“We’re working on the story — finding the right story,” said Carter, who also is James’ business manager.

Uninterrupted has emerged as a competitor to The Player’s Tribune, an online publishing platform founded by retired New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter, which has featured first-person stories, including Kobe Bryant’s retirement announcement.

“No disrespect, I don’t have any interest in The Player’s Tribune,” Green said.

Playing for the Warriors in Oakland for five seasons, Green has gotten to know Silicon Valley and gotten involved financially in the tech sector and real estate development. He said locker-room conversations with his Bay Area team often revolve around tech news.

“It’s a way for me that when I’m done with basketball I don’t have to say, ‘Oh, what am I going to do next?’” he said of his growing profile in the business world. “I’m making the transition now.”

Green will play for the U.S. at the Summer Olympics in Brazil. Asked about why he decided to play when other athletes are staying home due to fears about the Zika virus, he said, “I don’t knock their decision, but this is a dream come true for me. I’ve always wanted to go out and play for my country. Everybody’s talking about Zika and all this, but I can also walk outside tomorrow and get hit by a bus. So I’m going to the Olympics.”

Green arrived at the conference in Aspen on Monday, the day after his arrest for assault in Michigan — an incident that made national headlines and prompted Fortune’s Dan Primack to begin Tuesday’s panel by asking: “What happened, Draymond?”

“My legal team is handling it,” Green said in his first public comments on the incident. “It will be resolved really quickly. As a public figure I can’t put myself in certain situations. It’s something that I’ll learn from and move on.”

atravers@aspentimes.com


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