Aspen Art Museum: Kids dancing, bear costumes, virtual reality, mushroom eating | AspenTimes.com

Aspen Art Museum: Kids dancing, bear costumes, virtual reality, mushroom eating

David Stillman Meyer

It's understandable to be intimidated by the museum-wide exhibition currently on display at the Aspen Art Museum.

It's not exactly a "beach read" as far as art shows go, but with a little patience, and the help of some creative programming taking place Friday, you may just get your money's worth.

The un-hashtable exhibition title, "Wade Guyton Peter Fischli David Weiss," is a straightforward description of what is a slightly confusing collaboration among three artists, two living and one dead. It started when the museum asked Wade Guyton to install a room. He said he wanted to work with Peter Fischli, whose 30-year collaborator, David Weiss, had recently passed away in 2012. Ideas grew and so did the exhibition, which ended up extending from sidewalk to rooftop to two gently breathing stuffed animals on the lower level.

Friday, the museum will be filled with as many activities as there are media on display.

There will be rat and bear ears for dress up downstairs. Guests will be able to work through Guyton's "printing" techniques with a large-scale Epson printer. There will be a VR tour through Fischli Weiss' 3,000-photo installation, "Visible Worlds."

The Aspen Science Center will be upstairs with a special solar observation telescope to monitor the sunset — also upstairs, refreshments for mom and dad as well as a special sampling of edible flowers and mushrooms inspired by the Fischli Weiss "Flowers and Mushroom" slideshow.

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The can't-miss event starts at 3 p.m. in the lower level galleries. Aspen Art Museum Summer Workshop participants ages 6 to 8 and Soulskin Dance (a dance company out of San Francisco) have choreographed a site-specific interpretive dance among the works.

If 6-year-olds understand this exhibition, such that they can interpretive dance to it, maybe there's a chance for the rest of us.

Admission, as always, is free.

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