Trail rules | AspenTimes.com

Trail rules

Dear Editor:

A response to Roger Marolt’s column of June 10 regarding “A Few Ironclad Rules of the Road for Multi-use Trails” seems in order.

According to the writer, “might makes right ” between expert bikers , bicyclists, pedestrians, and horses. He characterized the “pecking order” on trails as an order where the most afraid person/animal defers to whomever causes that fear.

The top of his pecking order is expert bikers. They defer to nothing. We all can recognize the expert bikers by the signage on their shirts showing that they have sponsors. We must get out of their way.

1. The trails were paid for by all taxpayers. I suggest that the bikers pool their funds from sponsors and pave their own trails.

2. Since Marolt suggests that Might Makes Right, we know that expert bikers should fear cars just a little. According to his logic, the bikers should move off the road when I am behind them on a narrow road and can’t see around the corner to pass them.

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3. Horses are an integral part of the Roaring Fork Valley. Their owners have contributed to the trails, and horses have a right to be there. If a biker or a loose dog scares them, horses are going to react, and it is dangerous. Bicyclists should slow down and make themselves known to the equestrians.

4. The rules of trails are: Bikers defer to both pedestrians and horses, and pedestrians defer to horses. The gentlest of the creatures among us get the most protection.

By the way, Mr. Marolt, be careful when you are a senior citizen and some expert biker on a multi-use trail accidentally knocks you down, and you happen to break something. One day you may be among the grandpas who will need protection.

Adelaide Zabriskie

Snowmass

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