The abuse continues | AspenTimes.com

The abuse continues

Dear Editor:

This letter is in response to letters that appeared in both The Aspen Times and the Aspen Daily News on Aug. 27. To say we were astonished by Joe Farrell’s description of the Krabloonik dogs as “world-class athletes” is putting it mildly (Aspen Daily News).

One has to wonder if Joe has visited Krabloonik lately, or at all during the spring and summer months, to witness the deplorable conditions that exist. We either train or are considered world-class athletes and must ask the obvious: Do world-class athletes spend eight months of the year on six-foot chains? Are world-class athletes thrown a slop of food and water in the morning and then left alone all day? Are they deprived of basic medical care? When world-class athletes retire are they shot in the head? Do they run in small circles for months, unable to comprehend their new-found freedom? Can they barely walk because their backs and legs are so damaged? Are some of their bodies riddled with tumors from lack of medical attention?

The dogs at Krabloonik are a far cry from world-class athletes. They are abused, mistreated and ignored animals and yet they are as capable of being loving pets as the dogs many of us own and pamper.

To John Norman (Aspen Times): Our argument is not against dog-sledding, it is against animal abuse. You, yourself, point out that the dogs at the sledding operation you visited in Alaska were exercised and it was a well-run facility. This only proves that it is possible to operate a dog-sled business, especially one in Aspen/Snowmass, which humanely cares for its dogs, including social interaction with both humans and other canines. You suggest that if we don’t like what we see, that we not go to Krabloonik. Might we suggest that if you’re tired of reading about the abuses you quit reading the paper? We’re not going away and we will not stop voicing our concern and outrage until these dogs are healthy, exercised and well cared for, as is within keeping of the true spirit of the sport of dog sledding. Until then, you’ll be reading a lot more about the abuse of these 260-plus dogs.

Bill Fabrocini

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