Mayoral candidates discuss Snowmass | AspenTimes.com

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Mayoral candidates discuss Snowmass

Mayoral race

Markey Butler

I was a part-time Snowmass Village resident from 1988 through 2004 and have been full-time since then. I’m 68 and hold an associates degree in nursing, BSN in nursing and a master’s degree in health care administration.

I’m married to Jerry Butler and have two daughters.

Professional experience includes: registered nurse, executive director of HomeCare & Hospice of the Valley and multiple executive health care leadership positions in Michigan.

Current board experience includes (Roaring Fork Transportation Authority), Pitkin County Public Health Board, president and chair of Hospice & Palliative Care of the Rockies, Vice chair of Snowmass Village Rotary Foundation. I have also been the chair and board member of multiple nonprofit agencies in the U.S. and in Haiti.

I’m running for re-election because I thoroughly enjoy leading our council and our community. My many years of experience of leadership — to include the Planning Commission, serving for six years on Town Council and now mayor — provides me with the skills and knowledge to successfully move our community forward for the next two years.

Snowmass Sun: In your opinion, what are the top three issues facing Snowmass today and how would you approach solving them?

Markey Butler: Three key issues this community will face over the next few years include:

1. Our employee housing stock is inadequate to meet current and future demands. Several critical programs need to be launched to ease the burden; Addressing the “Aging in Place” while at the same time exploring options for building new complexes for the future employees and their families.

a. Council is launching an exploratory discussion with Pitkin County in hopes that (Snowmass Village), Aspen and Pitkin County can commence the exploration of a continuing care retirement community.

b. The town is exploring options in 2017 for potential development of employee housing

2. Construction in 2017 will create challenges for our residents, e.g., noise, dust, inconveniences on the roads, etc. At the same time, we will need to accommodate our many guests, groups and tourists who will come to (Snowmass Village) during the construction.

a. Our strategy will be for SMV Tourism, public works, planning and building department, and transportation to work proactively with the developers to minimize all of the inconveniences of construction. A construction management plan will guide the goal of minimizing all impacts for all.

3. Environmental impact of global warming. Snowmass Village will continue to explore multiple means to minimize our carbon footprint in concert with our regional, state and national municipalities while at the same time develop strategies to diversify economic impacts.

Snowmass Sun: What are your thoughts on the town’s handling of the Base Village project? What do you think needs to be done in the future?

Markey Butler: The Base Village approval process was extremely complicated and challenging. The commitment to complete the (planned-unit development) process required multiple meetings, hours of preparation time by all involved to accomplish the community’s directive to “move this village forward and get Base Village done.” I give everyone intimately involved an “A.”

What needs to be done in the future? Completion of the podium buildings, i.e., Building 7 and 8, the plaza and Building 6, which will potentially house the Snowmass Discovery Center and a coffee/restaurant. We will then commence the development of the other buildings east of the core podium complexes and ski-back trail (potential 2019).

Snowmass Sun: What are your feelings about the town’s handling of the Ice Age Discovery Center? What should the town’s role be in that project?

Markey Butler: The Ice Age Discovery Center, located on the mall, is operated by the town. It serves as an information center and a small museum celebrating the high alpine discovery of historic fossils over 50,000 years old.

In 2011, the town determined that it did not want to own and operate a museum and chose to help form a 501(c)3 nonprofit agency known as the Snowmass Discovery Center charged with telling and preserving the story of the remarkable discovery. The town has funded over $70,000 since 2011 in supporting the non-profit agency.

The Snowmass Discovery Center is anticipated to be located in a town-owned space (Building 6) of over 8,500 square feet in Base Village. The town will maintain ownership of the building, but the nonprofit will need to raise between $4.5 to $6 million for exhibits and operational cost of the Center. The town is currently negotiating a Memorandum of Understanding with the Snowmass Discovery Center regarding each entity’s role in the Discovery Center as well as future funding.

Snowmass Sun: What are some of the successes and failures of the current council?

Markey Butler: The most important and overarching success of our council has been the commitment to work together, to honestly debate issues, respect one another and at the end of the day enjoy working together on behalf of the community. This council went through a turbulent recall process, an appointment of a council member and a special election of another council member. Yet, when all of these dynamics could have impacted the work of council, we all determined that forward progress was our goal. Therefore we focused on the work of the community.

Our successes: (not all inclusive)

Approval of PUD ordinance No. 09 of 2015 to restart the development of Base Village.

Approval and current development of the roundabout.

Development and approval of the strategic plan for Parks, Open Space, Trails and Recreation with wonderful and extensive community involvement. This document will be the guiding document for the future of Snowmass Village recreational programs.

Development and pending approval for the Community Connectivity Plan.

Renovation of Brush Creek and Palisades employee-housing complexes.

Resolution on the iconic Krabloonik dogsled operations that now includes a community-wide oversight committee

Initiation of the community-involved revision of our Comprehensive Plan for our town. Kick-off Oct. 18!

Failures of our current council:

None.

Snowmass Sun: Ask yourself a question related to Snowmass and answer it.

Markey Butler: Can this Town Council continue to work as a team and continue to move our community forward?

Absolutely! We already have a list of priorities and I look forward to lead our council and the community over the next two years.

Richard C. Goodwin

I’m 88 years old and have lived in Snowmass for more than 25 years. I live at 385 Fairway Drive and own a Base Village condo in Capitol Peak. I was born in Philadelphia on Feb. 5, 1928. I am a retired builder and developer, having built over 5,000 residential homes, three shopping centers, two country clubs and 15,000 lots sold to other builders in the Philadelphia area. I served as President of the New Jersey Home Builder’s Association and am a founder of the National Housing Endowment. I am the creator of the Ethel Lawrence Endowment at Rutger’s Law School honoring “The Mount Laurel” decision that spread affordable housing throughout America. While my real estate career brought great successes, my philanthropic work has brought great satisfaction as a “second career.” I am a “Million Dollar Roundtable” volunteer fundraiser for the United Way of Burlington County, New Jersey. I am founder of the Goodwin Holocaust Museum of Delaware Valley and the Goodwin Holocaust Education Center in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, and a founder of the National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia. I am the benefactor of the Richard C. Goodwin College of Professional Studies at Drexel University, from which I received an honorary doctorate of human letters. I also serve on the Board of the American Friends of Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam, on the Advisory Council of J Street and I am the benefactor to the Richard C. Goodwin Daycare Center at the Maasai Heritage Preservation Foundation in Kenya, Africa. I and my son John have raised more than $1 million for prostate cancer research. I am the proud father of a daughter, two sons and grandfather of three.

I am running for mayor because my extensive experience as a builder and developer is much needed.

Snowmass Sun: In your opinion, what are the top three issues facing Snowmass today and how would you approach solving them?

Richard Goodwin: 1. All approvals should require bonding or financial guarantees of completion.

2. The officers and directors of the Base Village HOA and Metro Districts should only be Base Village owners.

3. Our energy code is full of holes. It should be modeled after the Rocky Mountain Institute’s new building in Basalt. No furnaces. I will pay for an energy code that provides for “renewable energy” as advocated by the American Renewable Energy Institute.

I would solve these by adding conditions to ordinance 9, 2015.

Snowmass Sun: What are your thoughts on the town’s handling of the Base Village project? What do you think needs to be done in the future?

Richard Goodwin: Poor. They did not protect the Base Village owners from causing new and unreasonable expenses. New conditions need to be added to the approval that safeguard Base Village owners and town residents.

I would solve these by adding conditions.

Snowmass Sun: What are your feelings about the town’s handling of the Ice Age Discovery Center? What should the town’s role be in that project?

Richard Goodwin: These expenses should not fall on Base Village owners.

Snowmass Sun: What are some of the successes and failures of the current council?

Richard Goodwin: Failure: To not require bonding of all private and public construction at 150 percent of cost. No requirement for renewable energy as per RMI Basalt building. Council does not answer letters from me.

Success: They see to it that all employees are paid their salaries and expenses.

Snowmass Sun: Ask yourself a question related to Snowmass and answer it.

Richard Goodwin: How should the new entrance at Town Center be planned?

New buildings with renewable energy — no furnaces.