Basalt firefighters salvage boy’s holidays by retrieving stranded drone | AspenTimes.com

Basalt firefighters salvage boy’s holidays by retrieving stranded drone

Basalt firefighters used a ladder truck Monday afternoon to safely retrieve a nine-year-old boy's new drone after it got stuck in a tree.

Firefighters aren't just coming to the rescue of cats these days.

Basalt firefighters salvaged a 9-year-old boy's holidays Monday when they extended a fire truck's ladder to retrieve an errant drone. The boy was out flying his new Christmas gift when a gust of wind deposited the craft high in a tree in front of the Streamside Apartments, along Two Rivers Road across from the Basalt public schools campus.

The boy and his family hucked a football at it a few times without luck, then someone in the group attempted to climb the tree to retrieve the drone. The boy's grandma called the Police Department to see if they had any alternative ideas. Basalt Police Sgt. Aaron Munch checked with the Fire Department and found personnel at the station in Basalt weren't busy at the time. They brought a ladder truck over to the site, which was barely more than a block from the station.

Lest any taxpayers get upset about the use of public resources to retrieve private property, Basalt Fire Chief Scott Thompson said it's a decision he didn't take lightly.

"I didn't want anyone getting hurt trying to get it out of the tree," Thompson said. "We could do it safely."

The truck extended its ladder and a firefighter was able to snag the drone. Better to have a call like that rather than a call for an ambulance if someone fell out of the tree, Munch concurred.

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The boy received his drone. The department got the satisfaction of helping someone during the holidays. Basalt retained some of its small-town charm.

Plus, the drone escaped injury.

"He did a test flight," Munch said.

Thompson said the latest kitten rescue was last summer when a young feline was stuck in a tree in the Elk Run subdivision for a couple of days and showed no sign of coming down on its own.

scondon@aspentimes.com

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