It’s the miles, not the years | AspenTimes.com

It’s the miles, not the years

Our community is fortunate to have skilled doctors like Drs. Pevny and St. John who are on the leading edge of technology.

For many who lead the active lifestyles here, there is a price to pay for the demands we place on our bodies. That price is wear and tear.

It seems to be human nature that we wait until a crisis occurs instead of taking steps to prevent problems from developing. A great philosopher once said, “Disease does not occur unexpectedly. It is a result of constant violation of nature’s laws. Spreading and accumulating of such violations transpire suddenly in the form of a disease – but it only seems sudden.”

The relationship between structure and function is universal. If things are in the right place, they work right. If they are not in the right place, they do not work right. The human body is no different.

The problem of a degenerative hip starts way before symptoms show up. After all, pain is usually the last symptom to appear and the first to leave. Pain is a great motivating factor.

It may be helpful to understand some factors that may contribute to arthritic or “wear and tear” conditions in the body. Our constant stress is gravity. The body works to adapt to stress as best as possible. Structural misalignments create stress patterns in the body.

Recommended Stories For You

If the pelvis is misaligned or if the feet have developed imbalances, adaptations in the body happen. Over a period of time, the body becomes less efficient in handling the stresses and we become aware of pain. Pain does serve a purpose. It is a warning sign that there is a problem.

Different forms of treatment may also lead to problems. The use of NSAIDS (non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs) may actually lead to continued degenerative changes. They are also the 15th leading cause of death in our country.

Many factors contribute to these problems. Chiropractors are trained in the structure/function relationship and how it relates to the restoration and maintenance of health.

We tune up our skis, bikes, toys and machines. Shouldn’t we do the same for our bodies? It’s not the years; it’s the miles that take the toll.

If people were aware of what they can do to prevent problems, they would avoid much of the degeneration and hopefully keep their bodies going so that we can get as much as possible and live the healthiest lifestyle possible.

Remember, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Hopefully, some will get hip to this idea before it is too late for their hip.

Tom Lankering, D.C.

Aspen

Go back to article