Cracked out, not crazy | AspenTimes.com

Cracked out, not crazy

Dear Editor:

I need to know what one does when you are 99 percent sure your neighbor is smoking crack and you are getting a sickening contact high from it. But it’s not enough to show on a test, and just enough to make you think you are losing your mind and know you are physically ill.

I called my landlord, the property manager, and the police. I checked in the hospital thinking I was going to have a stroke, couldn’t tie my shoe, strange words coming out. I even spent a week in a mental hospital, forced to, I might add, by the police and emergency room doctor at AVH, because they were sure I was out of my mind. Thank goodness I don’t have any children living here.

They thought I should be locked up; she acts like she is out of her mind. Delusional, psychotic, bipolar, to name a few; anything but admit the neighbor was smoking crack.

Gee, after that long week, with many people who had recently tried suicide – as a matter of fact, 10 teens in Mesa County had committed suicide in March alone – I never once mentioned I was going to hurt myself or anyone else. I’m pleading with the officers to make the smoking stop; they saw no signs of smoking and left.

They called my persistence harassment and threatened to arrest me (glad I didn’t see a Taser).

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Look, I was tired, the substance had been coming into my apartment for six days, and my small frame had its fill by the time I started making the calls.

Trust me, I get plenty of attention around town, I didn’t need any extra from the police department. I see the police in Denver taking people down with harassment and brutality. Please, not in Aspen.

Just to be clear, when I checked out of the hospital and had to take a five-hour bus ride back to Aspen, I had no money or ID on me because the police wouldn’t let me have anything before I was driven to the hospital.

Come to find out all the symptoms I was having really were symptoms from the coke and not a mental illness. Makes me never want to step foot in the Aspen Valley Hospital again, let alone call a police office in a time of need.

I still love this little town.

Maggie Dorrough

Aspen

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