Aspen to develop river management plan for upper Fork | AspenTimes.com

Aspen to develop river management plan for upper Fork

Brent Gardner-Smith
Aspen Journalism

The city of Aspen is seeking consultants to help it prepare a river management plan for the upper Roaring Fork River, which has been plagued in drought years by low flows as it winds through central Aspen.

"The city of Aspen plans to study the upper Roaring Fork River from its headwaters to a point just below the confluence with Maroon Creek," according to the city's request for proposals.

April Long, the city's stormwater manager, said the development of a river management plan was one of the Aspen City Council's top 10 goals in 2015. Long said she expects regional engineering firms specializing in water to put together teams of consultants and submit proposals to the city, which are due Jan. 15.

"Since 2008, the city has focused on improving the quality of water discharged through its outfalls. The city now feels it is important to focus its attention on one of the other probable causes for impairment — inadequate flows during periods of drought," the request says.

The city's proposal also says it expects proposed consulting teams "to include members with experience and expertise in water resources engineering, river science, hydrology, water quality, stream geomorphology, Colorado water rights and water law and group facilitation."

Long said the city's river management plan will be similar to the stream management plans that are called for in the recently released Colorado Water Plan, and that ongoing work being done by the Colorado Water Trust for Pitkin County on ways to add more water to the river will be looked at when formulating the city's river plan.

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"Our ultimate goal for the project is to develop a plan that outlines operational, management and physical options that improve the health of the river while respecting each stakeholder's rights and interests," the city's plan says.

The Roaring Fork River flows into the city's boundaries at Stillwater Drive, east of downtown Aspen.

The stretch of the river between there and the confluence with Castle Creek has been known to drop below 32 cubic feet per second, which the Colorado Water Conservation Board considers the minimum amount of water necessary to protect the river's environment "to a reasonable degree."

"In the early 2000s several studies investigated the health of the Roaring Fork River and reported a severely degraded or impaired stretch of river within the city," the proposal says. "The instream flow determined for this stretch in the 1970s is 32 cubic feet per second. During the droughts of 2002 and 2012, the river in this stretch dropped to only 5 cfs — only 15 percent of the instream flow."

One big factor in the amount of water in the Roaring Fork River through Aspen is the Salvation Ditch, an irrigation ditch that diverts water from the river at Stillwater Drive.

The ditch has a senior 1902 water right that allows as many as 58 cfs of water to be diverted and sent across lower Red Mountain to Woody Creek.

During the drought of 2012, there were days when there was more water flowing down the Salvation Ditch than was flowing down the Roaring Fork as it winds through town.

For example, according to a study done by S.K. Mason Environmental LLC, on July 27, 2012, there was 17.4 cfs flowing in the Salvation Ditch and 7.6 cfs of water flowing down the Fork below the ditch.

However, Tom Moore, the president of the Salvation Ditch Company, said the shareholders who own land along the ditch company also need the water in dry years, they have made significant investments in the water system and they are concerned about weakening their water right by not diverting the water.

He also pointed out that the Salvation Ditch water right is senior to the 1930s era water rights held by the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co., which diverts water under Independence Pass. As such, the Salvation Ditch plays a role in keeping water in the Roaring Fork River, he said.

Long said talking with the Salvation Ditch Co. will be an important part of the river management plan, which is why the city is seeking proposals that include consultants with an expertise in working with various stakeholders.

The city's proposal says "we hope that by determining valuable attributes of the river, we can work together as a community to lessen impairment and improve water quality, river health, ecological health, recreational opportunities and riparian habitat in ways that closer meet the community's goals."

Aspen Journalism is covering rivers and water in collaboration with The Aspen Times. More at http://www.aspenjournalism.org.

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