25-50-100 years ago | AspenTimes.com

25-50-100 years ago

Compiled by Janet Urquhart
Aspen Times Weekly

The headline pointed out the automobile was driven “by a woman” in this report on a local resident from The Aspen Democrat-Times a century ago:

DENVER – Mrs. Marcus Bastian, of Aspen, who is visiting in Denver, had a narrow escape from death late yesterday afternoon and sustained a fracture of her right arm in addition to numerous bruises, when she was struck by an automobile driven by Mrs. Harry L. Kortz, wife of a jeweler of 929 Sixteen street.

The accident occurred near the corner of Fifteenth and Arapahoe streets and according to Policeman Eacock, Mrs. Kortz appeared to lose control of the machine at this point with the result that it went onto the sidewalk and struck Mrs. Bastian a glancing blow, knocking her to the sidewalk and breaking her arm.

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Sunday dinner at the Hotel Jerome received a plug from The Aspen Democrat-Times. The newspaper offered this:

The dinner given at the Hotel Jerome last Sunday was such a successful affair that the management has decided to serve another dinner at 6 o’clock next Sunday evening. Those who enjoyed last Sunday’s dinner will surely be there and so should those who were not there.

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Cut out Sunday dinner at home and take all the family to the Jerome. The dinner will be entirely satisfactory and, besides, the good housewife will have a delightful change from the monotony of Sunday work.

Aspen’s top government official stepped down 50 years ago. The Aspen Times reported:

An opportunity to accept a better job and “council interference” here were cited by Leon A. Wurl, Aspen’s first City Administrator, as among the reasons for his resignation this week.

In a letter received by Mayor Mike Garrish yesterday, Wurl submitted his resignation, effective Oct. 1, to become superintendent of roads for Adams County, which borders Denver on the north and east. Adams County Commissioners made the announcement to Denver newspapers and wire services Tuesday.

In his new position, Wurl will have “complete responsibility for the maintenance and construction of all roads and bridges” in the county, his new employers said.

While other factors were involved, deterioration of relationships with several members of the Aspen City Council was a consideration – not necessarily the most important one – in his acceptance of the new position, Wurl told The Aspen Times.

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This year’s Aspen Music Festival season has come to a close. Fifty years ago, merchants complained that music students were disturbing the peace. The Aspen Times reported:

The musical tempest which rocked Aspen over the weekend was reduced to teapot dimensions by Monday, after quick intervention by Chamber of Commerce directors.

Saturday, August 19, Norman Singer, executive director and dean of the Music School, was given a warrant ordering him to appear in the City Magistrate’s court Monday to answer a complaint signed by four Aspen business people.

Bert Bidwell, Fritz Kaeser, Mrs. Walter Stroud and Mrs. Guido Meyer asserted in their complaint that noise made by music students practicing in the Prince Albert building had a “gross negative effect on their businesses” and that Singer had ignored their repeated requests to stem the noise. The official charge was “disturbing the peace,” according to Police Chief Cris Kralicek, who issued the warrant.

Aspen Valley Hospital had a new administrator 25 years ago. The Aspen Times reported:

A 40-year-old Oregon man has been hired as the new administrator at Aspen Valley Hospital and is scheduled to begin his new duties in mid-September.

Hans G. Wiik was chosen from more than 250 applicants for the job. His hiring has been approved unanimously by the AVH Board of Directors.

Wiik currently is a consultant for Healthlink, a system of five non-profit hospitals in Portland, Ore.

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More charter air service was in the offing for Aspen 25 years ago. The Aspen Times reported:

Executives from AirCal, a Newport Beach, California-based airline, will visit Aspen tomorrow to determine whether their planes are suitable for serving this area.

AirCal is considering contracting its British Aerospace 146 (series 200) jets to charter ski operators interested in bringing direct flights and tours to Aspen from Orange County Airport. AirCal’s jets are similar to the jets now used by Aspen Airways, but are of a different series.

Tour operators that have formerly used Grand Junction’s Walker Field as a gateway say their customers prefer to fly all the way into Aspen, rather than flying part way and having to ride a bus the rest of the distance.

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The building holds the Main Street Bakery and Cafe these days, but 25 years ago, a bakery of a different name was interested in the space. The Aspen Times reported:

Pending city approvals, Little Cliff’s Bakery will relocate to the Conner’s Building at the corner of Main and Aspen streets before the end of the year.

Owner Bill Little appeared before the Historic Preservation Committee this week for a pre-application meeting to secure approval for the building’s design. Little wants to move his bakery from 121 S. Galena to 201 E. Main St., but must first receive a conditional use permit from the city.

The exterior of the building, save for the stucco, which is to be cleaned up, will remain basically the same as it is now. A small addition to house necessary baking equipment may be built on the back.

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